Andrew

Andrew-before.jpg

My name is Andrew, I’m 41 years old, married with two primary school aged boys. We live in Perth and I work as a FIFO Electrical Mechanic. I have hereditary mild hypertension for which I take medication and it is well under control. My job is very active and involves climbing over large machines, working in the heat and shift work. In my down time I attended the gym, played handball, went fishing, metal detecting and was actively involved in playing sport with my boys.

When the vaccine was first introduced my wife and I both thought that it was rushed and it didn’t make sense that it was brought to market so quickly. We couldn’t understand how enough testing could have taken place and were very apprehensive about having it.

Eventually I was mandated to have it by my workplace. A few of my co-workers had theirs, and appeared to remain well and unaffected so I relaxed my position. Then it was recommended that my mum, who had a chronic lung condition, would be better protected if I was vaccinated. For these reasons I was a willing participant in the first and second vaccination.

My first was on 21 September, 2021 at a pop up immunisation clinic in Perth. The second was on 18th October at the same place and both vaccinations were given in my left arm as I am right handed. That was fortunate as I suffered a dead arm from both vaccinations, as well as muscle soreness throughout my body and a headache that lasted for a few days. As I had them on my week off I didn’t need to take time off work.

For the next three or so months I felt fine and continued to work as normal. But I had started to hear of people with adverse effects such as dizziness and vertigo. Then I heard rumours of a couple of unexplained deaths. At the beginning of February my workplace issued a directive that to maintain access to sites, I would need to provide evidence of vaccination number three. In my mind the adverse events were really beginning to stack up, so I held off to the last minute.

On 21st January, 2022 I had my third vaccination at a local GP clinic. The next morning I knew something was wrong. My calf muscles and hamstrings had a strange feeling, similar to cramp pain, but not as painful. I also had a headache, a sore neck and I felt very unwell. My work was keen for me to fly back on the 23rd but I managed to put off flying until the 24th and went straight to work. I still felt dreadful, and didn’t have the confidence to drive myself around the site, so enlisted a co-worker to drive for me.

Early the next morning I was overcome with dizziness and managed to make my way to my supervisor’s office. I was stumbling and falling to the left as I walked, and I felt drunk. He took me to the medical staff and they checked my vitals. By this time I was experiencing a heavy pressure and strong pain behind my ears. The conclusion was I was having a reaction to the vaccine and that I should take Nurofen and go to bed. Later, still feeling drunk, I stumbled to the canteen for dinner, and then went straight to bed afterwards.

I woke at 10pm having a kind of seizure. I tried to get up but flopped onto the floor like a fish out of water. Eventually I was able to lie on my back and reach the emergency number near my bed to call the medic. He arrived at 10.30pm and asked me to stand so he could perform a physical. I tried to stand but fell and hit my head and began to vomit. After a further series of unfortunate events I was eventually delivered by ambulance to Tom Price Hospital at 10.30am the next morning, 12 hours after my seizure.

At the hospital I was seen by staff immediately and given some medication. To this day I do not know what it was, and my records are ‘protected’. That afternoon I was taken by Royal Flying Doctor to Port Headland where I had a CT scan which came back as ‘inconclusive’. Another flight was arranged the next morning to take me to Royal Perth Hospital. I arrived in the evening and was asked if I had taken a PCR test, which at that point I hadn’t. I was left for hours in a hallway with ambulance crew monitoring me, and then later left alone in a COVID cubicle awaiting results, all the while feeling very sick and frightened.

Staff began treating me for a stroke, while awaiting results of an MRI. The results confirmed a diagnosis of cerebellar infarct – in other words, a clot in my right posterior cerebral artery. The doctors’ best educated guess was that there was a possible tear in my artery that caused the clot, and despite further tests to rule out other causes, the conclusion was that I showed no reason to have had a stroke.

Many doctors visited me over the four days while this diagnosis was being confirmed, as they were intrigued by my case. One doctor said she believed it was as a result of the vaccine, and by the reaction of the other doctors it became apparent that it was their conclusion as well. One junior doctor began a case study of me and I recently heard that my case was written up in the British Medical Journal in May of this year.

My symptoms after the stroke were horrific. I could not walk or sit up. My vision was blurred and I suffered constant vertigo and vomiting. I was incredibly tired and found simply talking draining, as my brain was in a constant fog. I was prescribed Stemetil for the vertigo and ondansetron for the nausea and vomiting and they eventually helped. I was given physio to help me start walking again.

At this point I had not seen my boys as visiting rules were heavily restricted. Then Perth Hospital announced a red alert where NO visits would be allowed, so I begged for my kids to be allowed to visit before this was in effect.

Just as I was starting to feel a little improvement, I was exposed to a nurse who tested positive for COVID. I was put into an isolation room where I was visited three times a day by a staff member in full hazmat gear, to be given food and to check my vitals. It was awful. I still couldn’t see properly and was left alone with my dark thoughts for two long days.

I was transferred to Fiona Stanley Rehabilitation Service where, for another two weeks, the only visitor I had was my wife. My mum was quite unwell by this time, and unable to come to see me, so we arranged for video calls. I worked hard on my rehab to get to the point where I was allowed to wheel outside in my wheelchair to visit with my boys. It was nearly four weeks since I had seen them so I was motivated to get permission to do this safely.

Finally I was discharged on 1st April, still unable to walk confidently and using a wheelchair most of the time. My eyesight was still blurry and the vertigo had not fully abated. My wife took leave from work to care for me until I was able to shower on my own and prepare myself drinks and snacks.

I returned to the rehab hospital for physio twice a week and had visits at home from the head injury unit. My sight improved to the point I could watch a bit of TV and my vertigo was gone.

Then, at the end of April I tested positive for COVID and all my gains were lost. My eyesight deteriorated again, the vertigo returned and my motor skills were affected. The actual COVID didn’t make me feel sick, but my recovery was impacted. I’d never suffered from depression, but as a result of all this I’ve now been prescribed anti-depressants and see a psychologist.

Further to this, my mum’s health was declining, and visiting her was complicated by the fact I’d had my license suspended while in hospital. I had to rely on others to take me to see her. She died in September, and I still feel cheated of time with her and believe these feelings have also impacted my recovery.

My driver’s license was reinstated in December and I have taken on a more caring role at home, while my wife works full time. I take my boys to school and do the food shopping. I find these tasks exhausting, and therefore set myself small goals each day.

I still get headaches that present like a knitting needle being shoved through my head. They last a few seconds, but sometimes come in waves. My left leg is sensitive to hot and cold, and feels numb from the hip down. The right side of my face is still numb and I have a droopy eye. I experience an odd tingling on my face and lips a few times each week, and the right side of my head feels ‘tight’. My neck still hurts and I am strangely aware of the spot in my head where the clot formed. Fatigue is an ongoing issue, but despite this I continue to push myself. I play with my boys and watch their sporting games. I cannot fully see the games as my eyes are still fuzzy, and I am unable to be a volunteer parent as I was in the past.

My employment contract allowed me a full year of pay at half rate and then I used long service leave which has now run out. It’s looks less likely that I will be able to return to my role in the future so I am waiting to hear what the options will be moving forward.

My doctors will not say if I will ever get completely better. They use positive language and talk about ‘gains’ and ‘small wins’. Every day I push myself to do the things that are normal. But every day I am really tired. To achieve one thing a day is all I can do. I am mostly optimistic that I will get better, but probably not to my old self, as I will always have this brain injury. And some days I struggle with the knowledge that I could have another stroke.

The government forced this procedure on us to keep our jobs and I am angry that they did not perform their due diligence to make sure it was safe for the population. I have joined the class action and hope for recognition and financial recompense for the suffering me and my family have endured.

Andrew-before.jpg

My name is Andrew, I’m 41 years old, married with two primary school aged boys. We live in Perth and I work as a FIFO Electrical Mechanic. I have hereditary mild hypertension for which I take medication and it is well under control. My job is very active and involves climbing over large machines, working in the heat and shift work. In my down time I attended the gym, played handball, went fishing, metal detecting and was actively involved in playing sport with my boys.

When the vaccine was first introduced my wife and I both thought that it was rushed and it didn’t make sense that it was brought to market so quickly. We couldn’t understand how enough testing could have taken place and were very apprehensive about having it.

Eventually I was mandated to have it by my workplace. A few of my co-workers had theirs, and appeared to remain well and unaffected so I relaxed my position. Then it was recommended that my mum, who had a chronic lung condition, would be better protected if I was vaccinated. For these reasons I was a willing participant in the first and second vaccination.

My first was on 21 September, 2021 at a pop up immunisation clinic in Perth. The second was on 18th October at the same place and both vaccinations were given in my left arm as I am right handed. That was fortunate as I suffered a dead arm from both vaccinations, as well as muscle soreness throughout my body and a headache that lasted for a few days. As I had them on my week off I didn’t need to take time off work.

For the next three or so months I felt fine and continued to work as normal. But I had started to hear of people with adverse effects such as dizziness and vertigo. Then I heard rumours of a couple of unexplained deaths. At the beginning of February my workplace issued a directive that to maintain access to sites, I would need to provide evidence of vaccination number three. In my mind the adverse events were really beginning to stack up, so I held off to the last minute.

On 21st January, 2022 I had my third vaccination at a local GP clinic. The next morning I knew something was wrong. My calf muscles and hamstrings had a strange feeling, similar to cramp pain, but not as painful. I also had a headache, a sore neck and I felt very unwell. My work was keen for me to fly back on the 23rd but I managed to put off flying until the 24th and went straight to work. I still felt dreadful, and didn’t have the confidence to drive myself around the site, so enlisted a co-worker to drive for me.

Early the next morning I was overcome with dizziness and managed to make my way to my supervisor’s office. I was stumbling and falling to the left as I walked, and I felt drunk. He took me to the medical staff and they checked my vitals. By this time I was experiencing a heavy pressure and strong pain behind my ears. The conclusion was I was having a reaction to the vaccine and that I should take Nurofen and go to bed. Later, still feeling drunk, I stumbled to the canteen for dinner, and then went straight to bed afterwards.

I woke at 10pm having a kind of seizure. I tried to get up but flopped onto the floor like a fish out of water. Eventually I was able to lie on my back and reach the emergency number near my bed to call the medic. He arrived at 10.30pm and asked me to stand so he could perform a physical. I tried to stand but fell and hit my head and began to vomit. After a further series of unfortunate events I was eventually delivered by ambulance to Tom Price Hospital at 10.30am the next morning, 12 hours after my seizure.

At the hospital I was seen by staff immediately and given some medication. To this day I do not know what it was, and my records are ‘protected’. That afternoon I was taken by Royal Flying Doctor to Port Headland where I had a CT scan which came back as ‘inconclusive’. Another flight was arranged the next morning to take me to Royal Perth Hospital. I arrived in the evening and was asked if I had taken a PCR test, which at that point I hadn’t. I was left for hours in a hallway with ambulance crew monitoring me, and then later left alone in a COVID cubicle awaiting results, all the while feeling very sick and frightened.

Staff began treating me for a stroke, while awaiting results of an MRI. The results confirmed a diagnosis of cerebellar infarct – in other words, a clot in my right posterior cerebral artery. The doctors’ best educated guess was that there was a possible tear in my artery that caused the clot, and despite further tests to rule out other causes, the conclusion was that I showed no reason to have had a stroke.

Many doctors visited me over the four days while this diagnosis was being confirmed, as they were intrigued by my case. One doctor said she believed it was as a result of the vaccine, and by the reaction of the other doctors it became apparent that it was their conclusion as well. One junior doctor began a case study of me and I recently heard that my case was written up in the British Medical Journal in May of this year.

My symptoms after the stroke were horrific. I could not walk or sit up. My vision was blurred and I suffered constant vertigo and vomiting. I was incredibly tired and found simply talking draining, as my brain was in a constant fog. I was prescribed Stemetil for the vertigo and ondansetron for the nausea and vomiting and they eventually helped. I was given physio to help me start walking again.

At this point I had not seen my boys as visiting rules were heavily restricted. Then Perth Hospital announced a red alert where NO visits would be allowed, so I begged for my kids to be allowed to visit before this was in effect.

Just as I was starting to feel a little improvement, I was exposed to a nurse who tested positive for COVID. I was put into an isolation room where I was visited three times a day by a staff member in full hazmat gear, to be given food and to check my vitals. It was awful. I still couldn’t see properly and was left alone with my dark thoughts for two long days.

I was transferred to Fiona Stanley Rehabilitation Service where, for another two weeks, the only visitor I had was my wife. My mum was quite unwell by this time, and unable to come to see me, so we arranged for video calls. I worked hard on my rehab to get to the point where I was allowed to wheel outside in my wheelchair to visit with my boys. It was nearly four weeks since I had seen them so I was motivated to get permission to do this safely.

Finally I was discharged on 1st April, still unable to walk confidently and using a wheelchair most of the time. My eyesight was still blurry and the vertigo had not fully abated. My wife took leave from work to care for me until I was able to shower on my own and prepare myself drinks and snacks.

I returned to the rehab hospital for physio twice a week and had visits at home from the head injury unit. My sight improved to the point I could watch a bit of TV and my vertigo was gone.

Then, at the end of April I tested positive for COVID and all my gains were lost. My eyesight deteriorated again, the vertigo returned and my motor skills were affected. The actual COVID didn’t make me feel sick, but my recovery was impacted. I’d never suffered from depression, but as a result of all this I’ve now been prescribed anti-depressants and see a psychologist.

Further to this, my mum’s health was declining, and visiting her was complicated by the fact I’d had my license suspended while in hospital. I had to rely on others to take me to see her. She died in September, and I still feel cheated of time with her and believe these feelings have also impacted my recovery.

My driver’s license was reinstated in December and I have taken on a more caring role at home, while my wife works full time. I take my boys to school and do the food shopping. I find these tasks exhausting, and therefore set myself small goals each day.

I still get headaches that present like a knitting needle being shoved through my head. They last a few seconds, but sometimes come in waves. My left leg is sensitive to hot and cold, and feels numb from the hip down. The right side of my face is still numb and I have a droopy eye. I experience an odd tingling on my face and lips a few times each week, and the right side of my head feels ‘tight’. My neck still hurts and I am strangely aware of the spot in my head where the clot formed. Fatigue is an ongoing issue, but despite this I continue to push myself. I play with my boys and watch their sporting games. I cannot fully see the games as my eyes are still fuzzy, and I am unable to be a volunteer parent as I was in the past.

My employment contract allowed me a full year of pay at half rate and then I used long service leave which has now run out. It’s looks less likely that I will be able to return to my role in the future so I am waiting to hear what the options will be moving forward.

My doctors will not say if I will ever get completely better. They use positive language and talk about ‘gains’ and ‘small wins’. Every day I push myself to do the things that are normal. But every day I am really tired. To achieve one thing a day is all I can do. I am mostly optimistic that I will get better, but probably not to my old self, as I will always have this brain injury. And some days I struggle with the knowledge that I could have another stroke.

The government forced this procedure on us to keep our jobs and I am angry that they did not perform their due diligence to make sure it was safe for the population. I have joined the class action and hope for recognition and financial recompense for the suffering me and my family have endured.

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