Brendon A

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Prior to the introduction of COVID-19 vaccines I was in excellent health, regularly engaging in vigorous physical activities such as jogging, mountain hiking, and frequent gym workouts. While I was not entirely opposed to the vaccines, I had reservations about their expedited testing processes and wished to conduct further research. However, I felt compelled to get vaccinated due to my employer’s requirements for on-site work and the Government portraying that essential workers must be vaccinated.

Following my vaccination in September 2021, I began experiencing severe and persistent symptoms including circulatory issues, heart rate irregularities, and extensive muscle cramps. Despite multiple visits to healthcare professionals and extensive testing, including consultations with general practitioners and specialists, my condition remained undiagnosed for a significant period. It is still somewhat under-diagnosed. Eventually, I was diagnosed with polycythaemia, an increase in red blood cells that thickens the blood; and later with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), a rare autoimmune disorder.

Throughout this period, I underwent over 240 documented tests and faced numerous health challenges, including potential diagnoses of lupus, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, and other autoimmune conditions. Despite exhaustive testing, the only definitive diagnosis reached was CRMO. Although in my opinion there is a correlation between the vaccination timeline and the onset of my health issues, medical professionals have been reluctant to confirm a direct link to the vaccine.

Moreover, I contracted COVID-19 multiple times post-vaccination, each time with a varying degree of severity, and further complicating my health situation. My journey underscores the complexities and frustrations many face in seeking answers and appropriate treatment for vaccine-related adverse effects.

I received the first dose of the Pfizer vaccine on September 1, 2021, and experienced only a sore arm. This initial mild reaction gave me the confidence to proceed with the second dose on September 22, 2021. However, shortly after the second dose, I began experiencing severe adverse symptoms. These included muscle cramps, coronary issues such as erratic heart rate ranging from 90 to 140 beats per minute, and respiratory difficulties. Additionally, I suffered from acute throat tightness, cold extremities, fatigue, headaches, visual disturbances, and widespread body cramps. These symptoms persisted and significantly impacted my quality of life.

In October 2021, I consulted with a general practitioner who, after ruling out Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and lupus through various tests, referred me to a haematologist. Despite multiple visits to the emergency department for severe symptoms, I often received anxiety-related diagnoses, which I knew were inaccurate. One notable finding during this period was an elevated haemoglobin level of 177g/L (normal range: 138-172g/L) and haematocrit level of 0.53 L/L (normal range: 0.40-0.54 L/L), indicating a risk of clotting disorders. Despite these findings I had no clear diagnosis and my symptoms persisted.

In December 2021, my haemoglobin levels further increased to 182g/L and haematocrit to 0.54 L/L, prompting another hospital visit where I received enoxaparin, a blood-thinning medication. This treatment provided temporary relief. During consultations with my haematologist, I raised concerns about a potential link between my symptoms and the Pfizer vaccine. However, despite the temporal correlation, the hematologist remained skeptical and did not confirm a connection.

By April 2022, I was diagnosed with polycythaemia, a condition characterised by an increase in red blood cells leading to thicker blood. I was prescribed low dose aspirin, which provided significant symptom relief, but caused gastritis. My health continued to deteriorate over the next two years and symptoms included rapid heartbeat, fatigue, nausea, fluctuating blood pressure, blurred vision, and headaches. At one point I lost sensation in my left leg, raising concerns of GBS again. This was subsequently ruled out by my then GP.

In early 2023, I began experiencing severe bone pain. Despite multiple medical assessments, a definitive diagnosis remained elusive until a second rheumatologist identified CRMO after a nuclear bone scan in March 2024. This autoimmune disorder causes the immune system to attack the bones. I was prescribed Fosamax to slow bone loss, which I declined due to the potential side effects.

Throughout my health journey, I explored various alternative treatments, including Ozempic for blood sugar management and bio resonance frequency therapy. These approaches provided some symptom relief.

Recently, my doctors considered stiff-person syndrome (SPS) due to my muscle tightness and blood sugar issues. I was prescribed Valium, which improved my symptoms. Behçet’s disease was also considered due to symptoms like rashes, mouth ulcers and inflamed eyes. A blood test for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), potentially indicative of another autoimmune condition, was somehow compromised and required retesting. I am currently awaiting the fresh results.

Despite reducing my pharmaceutical medication intake to one lower-dose prescription and seeking natural healing methods, my health challenges have persisted.

The onset and progression of my symptoms post-vaccination have significantly impacted my life. The prolonged diagnostic journey underscores the complexity of autoimmune disorders and the challenges associated with accurate identification and management. These experiences highlight the critical need for continued research, transparency, and support in addressing potential adverse effects of COVID-19 vaccines. It is critical to ensure that affected individuals receive appropriate care and validation, and it is crucial for the global medical community to integrate patient experiences into clinical evaluations to advance understanding and improve healthcare outcomes.

My message:
“If the government genuinely prioritised our health and well-being, there wouldn’t be such lack of transparency and media manipulation. It’s almost as if they think ignorance is bliss. But in reality, clarity and honesty are the true pillars of public trust and health. Let’s not pretend that sudden death syndrome and young heart attacks are just normal occurrences.”

Brendon-A-Image.jpeg

Prior to the introduction of COVID-19 vaccines I was in excellent health, regularly engaging in vigorous physical activities such as jogging, mountain hiking, and frequent gym workouts. While I was not entirely opposed to the vaccines, I had reservations about their expedited testing processes and wished to conduct further research. However, I felt compelled to get vaccinated due to my employer’s requirements for on-site work and the Government portraying that essential workers must be vaccinated.

Following my vaccination in September 2021, I began experiencing severe and persistent symptoms including circulatory issues, heart rate irregularities, and extensive muscle cramps. Despite multiple visits to healthcare professionals and extensive testing, including consultations with general practitioners and specialists, my condition remained undiagnosed for a significant period. It is still somewhat under-diagnosed. Eventually, I was diagnosed with polycythaemia, an increase in red blood cells that thickens the blood; and later with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO), a rare autoimmune disorder.

Throughout this period, I underwent over 240 documented tests and faced numerous health challenges, including potential diagnoses of lupus, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis, and other autoimmune conditions. Despite exhaustive testing, the only definitive diagnosis reached was CRMO. Although in my opinion there is a correlation between the vaccination timeline and the onset of my health issues, medical professionals have been reluctant to confirm a direct link to the vaccine.

Moreover, I contracted COVID-19 multiple times post-vaccination, each time with a varying degree of severity, and further complicating my health situation. My journey underscores the complexities and frustrations many face in seeking answers and appropriate treatment for vaccine-related adverse effects.

I received the first dose of the Pfizer vaccine on September 1, 2021, and experienced only a sore arm. This initial mild reaction gave me the confidence to proceed with the second dose on September 22, 2021. However, shortly after the second dose, I began experiencing severe adverse symptoms. These included muscle cramps, coronary issues such as erratic heart rate ranging from 90 to 140 beats per minute, and respiratory difficulties. Additionally, I suffered from acute throat tightness, cold extremities, fatigue, headaches, visual disturbances, and widespread body cramps. These symptoms persisted and significantly impacted my quality of life.

In October 2021, I consulted with a general practitioner who, after ruling out Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and lupus through various tests, referred me to a haematologist. Despite multiple visits to the emergency department for severe symptoms, I often received anxiety-related diagnoses, which I knew were inaccurate. One notable finding during this period was an elevated haemoglobin level of 177g/L (normal range: 138-172g/L) and haematocrit level of 0.53 L/L (normal range: 0.40-0.54 L/L), indicating a risk of clotting disorders. Despite these findings I had no clear diagnosis and my symptoms persisted.

In December 2021, my haemoglobin levels further increased to 182g/L and haematocrit to 0.54 L/L, prompting another hospital visit where I received enoxaparin, a blood-thinning medication. This treatment provided temporary relief. During consultations with my haematologist, I raised concerns about a potential link between my symptoms and the Pfizer vaccine. However, despite the temporal correlation, the hematologist remained skeptical and did not confirm a connection.

By April 2022, I was diagnosed with polycythaemia, a condition characterised by an increase in red blood cells leading to thicker blood. I was prescribed low dose aspirin, which provided significant symptom relief, but caused gastritis. My health continued to deteriorate over the next two years and symptoms included rapid heartbeat, fatigue, nausea, fluctuating blood pressure, blurred vision, and headaches. At one point I lost sensation in my left leg, raising concerns of GBS again. This was subsequently ruled out by my then GP.

In early 2023, I began experiencing severe bone pain. Despite multiple medical assessments, a definitive diagnosis remained elusive until a second rheumatologist identified CRMO after a nuclear bone scan in March 2024. This autoimmune disorder causes the immune system to attack the bones. I was prescribed Fosamax to slow bone loss, which I declined due to the potential side effects.

Throughout my health journey, I explored various alternative treatments, including Ozempic for blood sugar management and bio resonance frequency therapy. These approaches provided some symptom relief.

Recently, my doctors considered stiff-person syndrome (SPS) due to my muscle tightness and blood sugar issues. I was prescribed Valium, which improved my symptoms. Behçet’s disease was also considered due to symptoms like rashes, mouth ulcers and inflamed eyes. A blood test for glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), potentially indicative of another autoimmune condition, was somehow compromised and required retesting. I am currently awaiting the fresh results.

Despite reducing my pharmaceutical medication intake to one lower-dose prescription and seeking natural healing methods, my health challenges have persisted.

The onset and progression of my symptoms post-vaccination have significantly impacted my life. The prolonged diagnostic journey underscores the complexity of autoimmune disorders and the challenges associated with accurate identification and management. These experiences highlight the critical need for continued research, transparency, and support in addressing potential adverse effects of COVID-19 vaccines. It is critical to ensure that affected individuals receive appropriate care and validation, and it is crucial for the global medical community to integrate patient experiences into clinical evaluations to advance understanding and improve healthcare outcomes.

My message:
“If the government genuinely prioritised our health and well-being, there wouldn’t be such lack of transparency and media manipulation. It’s almost as if they think ignorance is bliss. But in reality, clarity and honesty are the true pillars of public trust and health. Let’s not pretend that sudden death syndrome and young heart attacks are just normal occurrences.”

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