Carl

Carl.JPG

My name is Carl. I’m 33 years old (31 when I got my 1st COVID vaccine). Prior to the vaccine I worked as the staff wellbeing co-ordinator for a big mining company. My job required yearly health screenings, the results of which consistently confirmed my excellent health.

I was extremely hesitant about the vaccine from the get go. I studied exercise physiology at university, so I had a good understanding of endocrinology and immunology. I knew the vaccine timeline was bad  because standard vaccine approval takes 10 to 15 years. 

The lack of long-term human-safety data worried me, too. I was right to be concerned because a US court later ordered Pfizer to release its safety data, which revealed that there were 1200 deaths in the first 90 days of the vaccine rollout. Pfizer had asked the court for this data not to be released for 75 years!

Although my concerns were high, my employer mandated the vaccine and I had extensive financial commitments. It wasn’t much of a choice, so I rolled the dice. 

I got my first and only Pfizer vaccine on the 18th of October, 2021 in my left arm. Within hours, I felt a complete lack of energy, which has pretty much lasted indefinitely. I track all aspects of my life, so I knew something was wrong immediately. As the day progressed, I got the classic cold and flu symptoms, so I called work to tell them I wouldn’t be flying in the next day. 

The next morning, I woke feeling extremely lethargic and as if I had been hit by a truck. After a few days, I improved enough to fly back to work the following week. Bouts of dizziness began soon after I started work and this led to a few tumbles. I took my vitals and, over the course of three hours, I showed signs of isolated hypotension (low diastolic blood pressure). I knew then that I had already developed either pericarditis or myocarditis because my heart struggled to fully expand and pump blood.

I attended the on-site emergency clinic where I had an ECG. Staff told me to leave early and to follow up with my GP.  I flew home and waited a further two days to see my GP. When I saw her, I said I was confident that I had either myocarditis or pericarditis, but she was reluctant to do another ECG.

I was frustrated because I knew what was going on. I told her that I had isolated hypotension, but she didn’t understand the term. Once I explained it, she said it was very unlikely for a 31-year-old to have this condition. She took my blood pressure (which was in the normal range) and sent me home. 



Over the next three days, I felt lethargic, but I went about my day as normal until I got very ill. It started with diarrhoea and vomiting and progressed to chills so severe that I had to wrap myself in blankets and hug a hot water bottle in the summer heat. In bed several hours later, my Apple watch notified me that I had a temperature of 39 Celsius and a heart rate of 138bpm and to seek medical help. It felt like someone was trying to seize my heart from my chest. My partner offered to take me to the hospital, but I said no because I didn’t want to die in a hospital bed. I also didn’t want to die beside my partner, so I got up and lay in the bathroom, waiting for what I thought was the inevitable.

As you can tell, I’m still here to tell my story. I basically toughed it out for the rest of the night. I clutched my chest for several sleepless hours, in crippling pain. I thought at the time that it was the longest night of my life. Little did I know much worse was ahead. 

The next day, I had a phone consultation with my GP and she told me to go to the emergency room straight away. I explained my condition on arrival at the Royal Perth Hospital and staff put me in a bed immediately.  Throughout the night, I had blood tests, X-rays, and more ECGs. While we awaited the results, some of the nurses tried to convince me I had anxiety. The results conclusively proved, however, that I had vaccine-induced pericarditis. This diagnosis is now on my official medical records.

I was in hospital for around five hours and then discharged with papers and directed to take colchicine and aspirin, neither of  which worked. Over the next two days I was at home, I felt horrible and lethargic. On the night of the second day, the episode that landed me in hospital returned with much greater intensity.  At first, I was reluctant to go to hospital, but my partner insisted and she drove me to Emergency. I presented to triage and again told them my condition was heart related. I was admitted within minutes.

The shivers and shakes got a lot worse, so they gave me some heated blankets. After about 10 or 15 minutes, I felt all the tell-tale signs of a heart attack. I had studied cardiac pulmonary health at university, so I knew the signs. I had a metallic taste in my mouth and sharp pains through my shoulder and left arm. I looked to the nurse to the right of me and told her that I thought I was about to have a heart attack and die. I told her that my partner was standing outside and asked the nurse to pass on the message, “I love you and I’m sorry.” Then I blacked out and had a heart attack. 

A few minutes later, I woke to see my partner by my side. I wept and told her I never thought I would see her again. I asked the nurse what happened and she said I passed out. I told her I had just had a heart attack and asked could I see my ECG. She refused. I had no energy to argue with her, so I let it go.  

A doctor came to check on me. He told me he feared for his health and that he could end up vaccine injured like me. He said that I was the 20th person that night to be admitted to the hospital with a COVID vaccine Injury. I was speechless and couldn’t believe what I was hearing.

They kept me overnight for observation, and I was discharged the next morning with the same diagnosis and directions to take colchicine and aspirin.  I had follow-up procedures over the coming weeks with several cardiologists and a multitude of tests, CT scans, ultrasounds, and bloodwork. All the results came back with the same diagnosis of pericarditis. Pericarditis is supposed to last for three to six weeks and then subside, but this hasn’t been the case. So I am left with a lifelong chronic heart condition of pericarditis, which is unheard of for my age group prior to the COVID vaccines.

Since my last hospital stay in November 2021, I have not had to go back for pericarditis episodes other than for a few check-ups. The last year has been by far the most challenging year of my life. I lost my job and financial stability, all while still trying to improve my own health and wellbeing. Against all odds, I’m grateful. I owe it to my partner for being 99% of the reason why I was able to do what I do and come back to where I am so grateful to be now.

I’m still dealing with chest pains, shortness of breath, and occasional dizziness. My resting heart rate is 85bpm. I haven’t let this define me, though. Through my online coaching business and refusing to give in and give up, I achieved the freedom to travel Australia and the world, finding and helping people wherever I go. Now that I have faced my own mortality several times, I have the capability to bring my service to a wider range of people. Now that I have less, I feel like I have more to give.

If I had one thing to say to you, all it would be this: Never back down.

Carl.JPG

My name is Carl. I’m 33 years old (31 when I got my 1st COVID vaccine). Prior to the vaccine I worked as the staff wellbeing co-ordinator for a big mining company. My job required yearly health screenings, the results of which consistently confirmed my excellent health.

I was extremely hesitant about the vaccine from the get go. I studied exercise physiology at university, so I had a good understanding of endocrinology and immunology. I knew the vaccine timeline was bad  because standard vaccine approval takes 10 to 15 years. 

The lack of long-term human-safety data worried me, too. I was right to be concerned because a US court later ordered Pfizer to release its safety data, which revealed that there were 1200 deaths in the first 90 days of the vaccine rollout. Pfizer had asked the court for this data not to be released for 75 years!

Although my concerns were high, my employer mandated the vaccine and I had extensive financial commitments. It wasn’t much of a choice, so I rolled the dice. 

I got my first and only Pfizer vaccine on the 18th of October, 2021 in my left arm. Within hours, I felt a complete lack of energy, which has pretty much lasted indefinitely. I track all aspects of my life, so I knew something was wrong immediately. As the day progressed, I got the classic cold and flu symptoms, so I called work to tell them I wouldn’t be flying in the next day. 

The next morning, I woke feeling extremely lethargic and as if I had been hit by a truck. After a few days, I improved enough to fly back to work the following week. Bouts of dizziness began soon after I started work and this led to a few tumbles. I took my vitals and, over the course of three hours, I showed signs of isolated hypotension (low diastolic blood pressure). I knew then that I had already developed either pericarditis or myocarditis because my heart struggled to fully expand and pump blood.

I attended the on-site emergency clinic where I had an ECG. Staff told me to leave early and to follow up with my GP.  I flew home and waited a further two days to see my GP. When I saw her, I said I was confident that I had either myocarditis or pericarditis, but she was reluctant to do another ECG.

I was frustrated because I knew what was going on. I told her that I had isolated hypotension, but she didn’t understand the term. Once I explained it, she said it was very unlikely for a 31-year-old to have this condition. She took my blood pressure (which was in the normal range) and sent me home. 



Over the next three days, I felt lethargic, but I went about my day as normal until I got very ill. It started with diarrhoea and vomiting and progressed to chills so severe that I had to wrap myself in blankets and hug a hot water bottle in the summer heat. In bed several hours later, my Apple watch notified me that I had a temperature of 39 Celsius and a heart rate of 138bpm and to seek medical help. It felt like someone was trying to seize my heart from my chest. My partner offered to take me to the hospital, but I said no because I didn’t want to die in a hospital bed. I also didn’t want to die beside my partner, so I got up and lay in the bathroom, waiting for what I thought was the inevitable.

As you can tell, I’m still here to tell my story. I basically toughed it out for the rest of the night. I clutched my chest for several sleepless hours, in crippling pain. I thought at the time that it was the longest night of my life. Little did I know much worse was ahead. 

The next day, I had a phone consultation with my GP and she told me to go to the emergency room straight away. I explained my condition on arrival at the Royal Perth Hospital and staff put me in a bed immediately.  Throughout the night, I had blood tests, X-rays, and more ECGs. While we awaited the results, some of the nurses tried to convince me I had anxiety. The results conclusively proved, however, that I had vaccine-induced pericarditis. This diagnosis is now on my official medical records.

I was in hospital for around five hours and then discharged with papers and directed to take colchicine and aspirin, neither of  which worked. Over the next two days I was at home, I felt horrible and lethargic. On the night of the second day, the episode that landed me in hospital returned with much greater intensity.  At first, I was reluctant to go to hospital, but my partner insisted and she drove me to Emergency. I presented to triage and again told them my condition was heart related. I was admitted within minutes.

The shivers and shakes got a lot worse, so they gave me some heated blankets. After about 10 or 15 minutes, I felt all the tell-tale signs of a heart attack. I had studied cardiac pulmonary health at university, so I knew the signs. I had a metallic taste in my mouth and sharp pains through my shoulder and left arm. I looked to the nurse to the right of me and told her that I thought I was about to have a heart attack and die. I told her that my partner was standing outside and asked the nurse to pass on the message, “I love you and I’m sorry.” Then I blacked out and had a heart attack. 

A few minutes later, I woke to see my partner by my side. I wept and told her I never thought I would see her again. I asked the nurse what happened and she said I passed out. I told her I had just had a heart attack and asked could I see my ECG. She refused. I had no energy to argue with her, so I let it go.  

A doctor came to check on me. He told me he feared for his health and that he could end up vaccine injured like me. He said that I was the 20th person that night to be admitted to the hospital with a COVID vaccine Injury. I was speechless and couldn’t believe what I was hearing.

They kept me overnight for observation, and I was discharged the next morning with the same diagnosis and directions to take colchicine and aspirin.  I had follow-up procedures over the coming weeks with several cardiologists and a multitude of tests, CT scans, ultrasounds, and bloodwork. All the results came back with the same diagnosis of pericarditis. Pericarditis is supposed to last for three to six weeks and then subside, but this hasn’t been the case. So I am left with a lifelong chronic heart condition of pericarditis, which is unheard of for my age group prior to the COVID vaccines.

Since my last hospital stay in November 2021, I have not had to go back for pericarditis episodes other than for a few check-ups. The last year has been by far the most challenging year of my life. I lost my job and financial stability, all while still trying to improve my own health and wellbeing. Against all odds, I’m grateful. I owe it to my partner for being 99% of the reason why I was able to do what I do and come back to where I am so grateful to be now.

I’m still dealing with chest pains, shortness of breath, and occasional dizziness. My resting heart rate is 85bpm. I haven’t let this define me, though. Through my online coaching business and refusing to give in and give up, I achieved the freedom to travel Australia and the world, finding and helping people wherever I go. Now that I have faced my own mortality several times, I have the capability to bring my service to a wider range of people. Now that I have less, I feel like I have more to give.

If I had one thing to say to you, all it would be this: Never back down.

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