Valerie

Valerie3.jpg

My name is Valerie, I am married with a 4-year-old son and we live in Northern NSW. I work as an operations manager for a commercial business and also part-time as a cleaner.

Prior to having the COVID vaccine I enjoyed reasonable health. I was slightly overweight and suffered occasional rashes and allergies to some foods. I have a congenital eye disorder where my left eye didn’t develop properly in utero. Regular botox has corrected this over the past six years.

I didn’t take any medication until the first lock-down. At this stage I lost 40% of my income and had to take on a second job to supplement our household. As a result of this I started to suffer from anxiety and was prescribed some anxiety medication and CBD oil. I began regular sessions with a psychotherapist and was having good results.

I’ve always been interested in health and my hobby was experimenting with fresh veggie and fruit juices, and as we live near the beach, our family enjoyed a sun and sand filled lifestyle. Adding to our family was on the horizon too.

When the vaccine was introduced I tried to convince myself that it was for the greater good. My intuition said NO, but I am a positive person, so I tried to polish up the vaccine in my mind as it being a good thing. My job involved interstate travel and I could see the writing on the wall if I refused it. So I convinced myself I would be fine because at that stage I had met no one with an injury. I was the last person at my workplace to succumb.

I booked in to have the vaccination on 14 September, 2021 at Priceline in Ballina. I read the consent form and signed it despite the butterflies in my stomach. I was injected with the AstraZeneca vaccine in my right arm. I felt fine and was really happy to have it over with. Two days later I celebrated my birthday and felt normal.

Three weeks after the vaccination I noticed an unusual rash on my thighs and shins. It was only slightly itchy, however it looked really angry, red and spotty. Initially I thought it was hives so took antihistamines. After a week it still hadn’t improved. I was still working two jobs, so I didn’t prioritise doing anything about it.

Then I noticed I was bruising really easily. I put that down to my toddler being ‘rough’ with me.  But soon I could press on my own arm or leg and leave a bruise. When I went to my regular botox appointment, for the first time ever the needles made me bleed. The doctor was alarmed and said to me, “You’re not a bleeder, what’s changed?” I suggested it was the CBD oil I had started taking and we agreed it was probably that. Later that day bruises appeared where the needles had been applied, which was also unusual.

On Monday 18th October I woke to find a haematoma on my left knee. I couldn’t recall hitting my knee, so I decided to see a GP. My regular GP was closed for the day, so I phoned another local clinic. I told the receptionist I thought I had a vaccine injury. She queried how long ago I was vaccinated and when I said five weeks she laughed and said, “It cannot be that!”

When I saw the doctor he concluded it was simply anxiety! But he did agree to do some blood tests. I went straight to the blood clinic, and the phlebotomist missed my vein the first time so had to have a second attempt. When I got home the blood from the first attempt was soaking through the bandage so my husband taped it up for me more securely.

By morning blood was still spurting from my arm. I woke to four missed calls from the blood lab and two from the GP. I called the GP straight away and he told me my platelets were dangerously low and I needed to go straight to hospital. They were at 3 when they should range between 150-450. My husband took me straight to hospital where the staff wouldn’t allow him to come in as he’d only had one vaccination. I waited alone for five hours to see a haematologist. It was incredibly frightening as my mind went to some very dark places, including what would happen to our plans for another baby.

Finally I was seen by the haematologist and he prescribed two immediate transfusions of Intragram. The first was given that night and my platelets jumped up to about 65 and after the second transfusion my platelets reached 157. I was discharged with a confirmed and documented diagnosis of vaccine induced immune thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) caused by the AstraZeneca vaccine. The treatment for this was a confusing regimen of steroids (dexamethasone and prednisone) to be taken daily and to be slowly decreased. The only upside was that I was issued an exemption from future vaccinations.

My local pathology clinic would check my platelets each week but despite the steroid treatment my platelets continued to drop. After two weeks I started to work from home again, but I felt dreadful as the steroids made sleep impossible and seemed to heighten my anxiety. My heart would race and it affected my mood to the point I felt almost manic.

On the 8th December I slipped and fell while in our garage and twisted my ankle. The resulting haematoma was so bad, I called the haematologist and he said to go straight to emergency and to prepare to stay for a couple nights. At this stage my platelets had dropped to 13 and I had been planning to go back to hospital, but the fall brought my visit forward.

Once again, I had two transfusions of Intragram and was prescribed more dexamethasone.
My bed was in a busy ward filled with very ill patients. Without revealing too much private information I will just say that I was witness to a sad and shocking death. This death caused the nurses much distress, to the point many of them were crying. I also took it very hard. To say I was emotionally triggered would be an understatement.

I was discharged, once again with the complicated regimen of steroid weaning. Over the next few days my husband observed me going on a manic spending spree, where I spent over $300 on chocolates for the nurses at the hospital. I was also spending online, buying expensive clothes and accessories, which is out of character for me. He questioned me about the medication I was taking and decided he should monitor the dosage, as he was increasingly concerned by my behaviour.

He didn’t manage my medication any better and by mid-December I was not only manic, but experiencing hallucinations. I had become delusional, speaking at a fast rate and inappropriately laughing in a ‘cackling’ way. This behaviour was witnessed by my husband, brother and a close friend. They were all perplexed by my behaviour but humoured me as they were quite scared of how I might respond. It was fortunate that our nanny helped by working full time, so my son did not have to see the worst of my behaviour. But he definitely knew something was up with mummy.

By the 19th December my husband decided to take me back to hospital, as my behaviour had escalated to the point I was running around the house singing and believed I was going to a party where I was the special guest. It felt like I was losing myself, as I knew I was being ‘weird’ but couldn’t stop.

At the hospital I literally ran into the emergency bay and began yelling at the staff. I had my then two-year-old son in my arms, so my husband came and took him from me because people were looking at me in horror. The police were called and were ready to take me away, but my husband intervened and told them he believed it was the steroids causing my behaviour. I was given a tablet to sedate me, and I soon felt like I had just come off a wild roller coaster ride.

An ambulance was called to take me to Lismore hospital, and on the trip I fell asleep for the first time in a week. At Lismore I was monitored, but by that time I had calmed right down and they simply allowed me to sleep. In the morning I felt completely normal again. The staff allowed me to go home.

I took a further two weeks sick leave and attended my psychotherapist where I had hypnotherapy and counselling for the shame I felt because of my behaviour. My haematologist prescribed a much lower dose of the steroid that I was to reduce slowly in the hope that my immune system would stop attacking the platelets.

As I weaned off the steroid I felt a bit better. However then the PTSD started to kick in. The whole experience had really affected me, from witnessing the death of the patient, to my outrageous behaviour in front of family and the public. I would spend days lying on the couch replaying the experiences in my mind.

For the next six months my platelets ranged from 37 to 70 – with an average reading of about 50. Fortunately I was able to push through and continued working from home despite the fact I felt fatigued all the time. I was trying to get on with life by continuing to see my therapist, taking my anxiety medication and participating in life with friends and family as much as possible.

My mum and dad live in Gundagai, so in November 2022 I decided to take a trip with my son to visit them. I was tired of being tired and feeling sorry for myself, and this was something that I could look forward to.

As a special treat to myself, on the way through Sydney I went to a presentation by my favourite spiritual teacher, Ester Hicks. This motivational talk was my ‘ah-ha’ moment and gave me the impetus I needed to take my health into my own hands. It was as if a fog lifted and I was able to see my position more clearly and I was determined to find a healthy way forward.

Upon returning home I started researching different cleansing protocols, including a cleanse recommended by Medical Medium called the 3/6/9 Liver Rescue Cleanse. I did this cleanse five times. Each time consisted of nine days of cleansing juices, salads, and raw food. I added zinc, lemon balm, ashwaganda, propolis, Vitamin C and lysine to this – anything to help my immune system.

I lived on fresh food, low salt, no animal products, no oil, and heavy metal detox smoothies. Soon my mood elevated, I had more energy and I lost 15kg, 10kg of which I gained as a result of taking the steroid medication. My platelets started to increase within a few weeks and continued to go up. By March of this year my platelets reached 114 and the haematologist told me I was officially in remission.

Recently my doctor gave me the green light to be able to try to have another baby as my body is healthy enough to cope.

My motivation to tell my story is because I was in such mental despair and so physically fatigued that I became my own detective and healed myself. I encourage anyone who is still struggling with poor health to contact me for inspiration. Vaccine injuries are real. People need help and I would like to offer hope to those who are despair.

Valerie3.jpg

My name is Valerie, I am married with a 4-year-old son and we live in Northern NSW. I work as an operations manager for a commercial business and also part-time as a cleaner.

Prior to having the COVID vaccine I enjoyed reasonable health. I was slightly overweight and suffered occasional rashes and allergies to some foods. I have a congenital eye disorder where my left eye didn’t develop properly in utero. Regular botox has corrected this over the past six years.

I didn’t take any medication until the first lock-down. At this stage I lost 40% of my income and had to take on a second job to supplement our household. As a result of this I started to suffer from anxiety and was prescribed some anxiety medication and CBD oil. I began regular sessions with a psychotherapist and was having good results.

I’ve always been interested in health and my hobby was experimenting with fresh veggie and fruit juices, and as we live near the beach, our family enjoyed a sun and sand filled lifestyle. Adding to our family was on the horizon too.

When the vaccine was introduced I tried to convince myself that it was for the greater good. My intuition said NO, but I am a positive person, so I tried to polish up the vaccine in my mind as it being a good thing. My job involved interstate travel and I could see the writing on the wall if I refused it. So I convinced myself I would be fine because at that stage I had met no one with an injury. I was the last person at my workplace to succumb.

I booked in to have the vaccination on 14 September, 2021 at Priceline in Ballina. I read the consent form and signed it despite the butterflies in my stomach. I was injected with the AstraZeneca vaccine in my right arm. I felt fine and was really happy to have it over with. Two days later I celebrated my birthday and felt normal.

Three weeks after the vaccination I noticed an unusual rash on my thighs and shins. It was only slightly itchy, however it looked really angry, red and spotty. Initially I thought it was hives so took antihistamines. After a week it still hadn’t improved. I was still working two jobs, so I didn’t prioritise doing anything about it.

Then I noticed I was bruising really easily. I put that down to my toddler being ‘rough’ with me.  But soon I could press on my own arm or leg and leave a bruise. When I went to my regular botox appointment, for the first time ever the needles made me bleed. The doctor was alarmed and said to me, “You’re not a bleeder, what’s changed?” I suggested it was the CBD oil I had started taking and we agreed it was probably that. Later that day bruises appeared where the needles had been applied, which was also unusual.

On Monday 18th October I woke to find a haematoma on my left knee. I couldn’t recall hitting my knee, so I decided to see a GP. My regular GP was closed for the day, so I phoned another local clinic. I told the receptionist I thought I had a vaccine injury. She queried how long ago I was vaccinated and when I said five weeks she laughed and said, “It cannot be that!”

When I saw the doctor he concluded it was simply anxiety! But he did agree to do some blood tests. I went straight to the blood clinic, and the phlebotomist missed my vein the first time so had to have a second attempt. When I got home the blood from the first attempt was soaking through the bandage so my husband taped it up for me more securely.

By morning blood was still spurting from my arm. I woke to four missed calls from the blood lab and two from the GP. I called the GP straight away and he told me my platelets were dangerously low and I needed to go straight to hospital. They were at 3 when they should range between 150-450. My husband took me straight to hospital where the staff wouldn’t allow him to come in as he’d only had one vaccination. I waited alone for five hours to see a haematologist. It was incredibly frightening as my mind went to some very dark places, including what would happen to our plans for another baby.

Finally I was seen by the haematologist and he prescribed two immediate transfusions of Intragram. The first was given that night and my platelets jumped up to about 65 and after the second transfusion my platelets reached 157. I was discharged with a confirmed and documented diagnosis of vaccine induced immune thrombocytopenia (low platelet count) caused by the AstraZeneca vaccine. The treatment for this was a confusing regimen of steroids (dexamethasone and prednisone) to be taken daily and to be slowly decreased. The only upside was that I was issued an exemption from future vaccinations.

My local pathology clinic would check my platelets each week but despite the steroid treatment my platelets continued to drop. After two weeks I started to work from home again, but I felt dreadful as the steroids made sleep impossible and seemed to heighten my anxiety. My heart would race and it affected my mood to the point I felt almost manic.

On the 8th December I slipped and fell while in our garage and twisted my ankle. The resulting haematoma was so bad, I called the haematologist and he said to go straight to emergency and to prepare to stay for a couple nights. At this stage my platelets had dropped to 13 and I had been planning to go back to hospital, but the fall brought my visit forward.

Once again, I had two transfusions of Intragram and was prescribed more dexamethasone.
My bed was in a busy ward filled with very ill patients. Without revealing too much private information I will just say that I was witness to a sad and shocking death. This death caused the nurses much distress, to the point many of them were crying. I also took it very hard. To say I was emotionally triggered would be an understatement.

I was discharged, once again with the complicated regimen of steroid weaning. Over the next few days my husband observed me going on a manic spending spree, where I spent over $300 on chocolates for the nurses at the hospital. I was also spending online, buying expensive clothes and accessories, which is out of character for me. He questioned me about the medication I was taking and decided he should monitor the dosage, as he was increasingly concerned by my behaviour.

He didn’t manage my medication any better and by mid-December I was not only manic, but experiencing hallucinations. I had become delusional, speaking at a fast rate and inappropriately laughing in a ‘cackling’ way. This behaviour was witnessed by my husband, brother and a close friend. They were all perplexed by my behaviour but humoured me as they were quite scared of how I might respond. It was fortunate that our nanny helped by working full time, so my son did not have to see the worst of my behaviour. But he definitely knew something was up with mummy.

By the 19th December my husband decided to take me back to hospital, as my behaviour had escalated to the point I was running around the house singing and believed I was going to a party where I was the special guest. It felt like I was losing myself, as I knew I was being ‘weird’ but couldn’t stop.

At the hospital I literally ran into the emergency bay and began yelling at the staff. I had my then two-year-old son in my arms, so my husband came and took him from me because people were looking at me in horror. The police were called and were ready to take me away, but my husband intervened and told them he believed it was the steroids causing my behaviour. I was given a tablet to sedate me, and I soon felt like I had just come off a wild roller coaster ride.

An ambulance was called to take me to Lismore hospital, and on the trip I fell asleep for the first time in a week. At Lismore I was monitored, but by that time I had calmed right down and they simply allowed me to sleep. In the morning I felt completely normal again. The staff allowed me to go home.

I took a further two weeks sick leave and attended my psychotherapist where I had hypnotherapy and counselling for the shame I felt because of my behaviour. My haematologist prescribed a much lower dose of the steroid that I was to reduce slowly in the hope that my immune system would stop attacking the platelets.

As I weaned off the steroid I felt a bit better. However then the PTSD started to kick in. The whole experience had really affected me, from witnessing the death of the patient, to my outrageous behaviour in front of family and the public. I would spend days lying on the couch replaying the experiences in my mind.

For the next six months my platelets ranged from 37 to 70 – with an average reading of about 50. Fortunately I was able to push through and continued working from home despite the fact I felt fatigued all the time. I was trying to get on with life by continuing to see my therapist, taking my anxiety medication and participating in life with friends and family as much as possible.

My mum and dad live in Gundagai, so in November 2022 I decided to take a trip with my son to visit them. I was tired of being tired and feeling sorry for myself, and this was something that I could look forward to.

As a special treat to myself, on the way through Sydney I went to a presentation by my favourite spiritual teacher, Ester Hicks. This motivational talk was my ‘ah-ha’ moment and gave me the impetus I needed to take my health into my own hands. It was as if a fog lifted and I was able to see my position more clearly and I was determined to find a healthy way forward.

Upon returning home I started researching different cleansing protocols, including a cleanse recommended by Medical Medium called the 3/6/9 Liver Rescue Cleanse. I did this cleanse five times. Each time consisted of nine days of cleansing juices, salads, and raw food. I added zinc, lemon balm, ashwaganda, propolis, Vitamin C and lysine to this – anything to help my immune system.

I lived on fresh food, low salt, no animal products, no oil, and heavy metal detox smoothies. Soon my mood elevated, I had more energy and I lost 15kg, 10kg of which I gained as a result of taking the steroid medication. My platelets started to increase within a few weeks and continued to go up. By March of this year my platelets reached 114 and the haematologist told me I was officially in remission.

Recently my doctor gave me the green light to be able to try to have another baby as my body is healthy enough to cope.

My motivation to tell my story is because I was in such mental despair and so physically fatigued that I became my own detective and healed myself. I encourage anyone who is still struggling with poor health to contact me for inspiration. Vaccine injuries are real. People need help and I would like to offer hope to those who are despair.

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